National Day of Prayer: The battle for America’s soul

Today, April 7, is the National Day of Prayer.

The day became official in 1952; however, it traces its origins back to the Second Continental Congress, those folks who drafted our Constitution. As in the Founding Fathers, who founded our nation and the ideas that shaped America.

It’s no surprise the folks at the ultra-liberal Huffington Post do not like the National Day of Prayer. They do not like anything to do with the Constitution, the Founding Fathers or the true God of the Bible.

J. Andrew Daugherty wrote a blog on the Huff Post titled “Jesus Doesn’t Need a National Day of Prayer (and neither do we).”

An excerpt:

My point is this: let’s not confuse patriotism and genuine piety. Neither is it spiritually wise to lump a practice as sacred as prayer into the narrative of American exceptionalism with the flashy spectacles of what can be construed by even the most bona fide of the blessed as a self-congratulatory occasion.

But Psalm 86:9 (which is part of the Jews’ scriptures too, not just Christians) says:

All the nations you have made will come and worship before you, Lord; they will bring glory to your name.

From Romans 14:11:

It is written: “‘As surely as I live,’ says the Lord, ‘every knee will bow before me; every tongue will acknowledge God.'”

God crowns the nation’s leaders. All nations will one day bow before Jesus and acknowledge Him as God.

Make no mistake — we are battling for the soul of America. You either follow Jesus or you are in rebellion against Him. The secularists/humanists/atheists would say there is no God, or all religions are right (which is a contradiction). There is only one God, the God of the Bible. It is good that America has a national day to honor God (and no matter what critics say, Americans are not forced to worship God, so the government is not endorsing one particular religion). No matter what the secularists say, this is part of America, a tradition that predates even the Constitution.

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